Posts Tagged: origins of phrases

Out on a limb

  Look what’s back! Blowing off the cobwebs on this old favorite in honor of an especially bizarre interview by a loyalty-challenged (and possibly paranoid) famous celebrity. I know you’ll see the theme, but can you guess the celebrity?         Thrown under the bus – Oddly enough, this is a recent (and overused… Read more »

Out on a limb

  Look who’s back! We’ll call this our “where’s the beef” edition of our fan-favorite feature about the origins of the phrases we commonly use. This entry is all about “the other white meat”…             This is more ham-fisted than handed, but either way, that is not the way to tenderize… Read more »

Out on a limb

Out on a limb Our other monthly feature returns after a brief hiatus. Time to learn the origins of some of those catchy phrases you use or hear so often.  I think you should have no problem “seeing” the theme for this week!     That would explain the divorce rate… Love is blind – … Read more »

Out on a limb

  Time for our newest monthly installment in the feature that both educates and amuses as we venture to the past to find out just how those phrases we all love so much came to be.        No sense crying over the past… Let bygones be bygones – In the 15th century, a… Read more »

Out on a Limb

      Out on a Limb   This month’s installment is for those who have been bad.  Not you, of course, I must be talking about someone you know… It’s just a reprimand.  Quit acting like a baby! Called on the carpet – In military parlance, called on the carpet refers to having to… Read more »