Leap year

image_pdfimage_print

leap yearEver four years we have a leap year (sort of, see below) and every four years we elect a president.

The two are not a reflection of the other. The former, an alteration to “correct” the calendar and the latter, an alteration to “correct” the country.

That we have an extra day in the year to mull over our elective choices is just a happy benefit. Still, what could be Carpe Diem (“Seize the Day”) is more appropriately Carpe Apologus (“Seize the Narrative”).

Donald Trump is a racist

Hillary Clinton wants to eliminate the 2nd Amendment

More often than not, every leap year turns into a leap to conclusion. Take one part partisan rhetoric, sprinkle one part unverifiable comment, add a touch of talking head support and just a pinch of truth (for seasoning) and you have the most common recipe for campaigning.

Did Donald Trump make racist statements? Yup. Does that prove he’s a racist? Nope.

Does Hillary Clinton want to ban assault weapons? Yup. Does that eliminate the 2nd Amendment? Nope.

Hillary Clinton won’t release her speeches – she must be hiding something

Donald Trump won’t release his taxes – he must be hiding something

It’s easy to join the leaping crowd. There’s a springboard for each side to jump into the pool.

One thing to consider, though, if the rumors are empty, jumping to that conclusion could be just as disastrous as into a real empty pool, not just a metaphoric one. At best, you look stupid and at worst, you hurt yourself in reputation and profession.

For me, I try to stay dry and undamaged by attempting to gather as much information as I can and taking both parties’ narratives with a full salt shaker.

Then, in November, I’ll try to make the best decision I can and hope for the best outcome.

This leap year, why not try finding out what’s real about each party and candidate. Then, instead of a leap to conclusion, you can make a leap of faith.

Oh, for those asking, presidential elections occur every four years but not every election is on a leap year. That’s because the calendar adjustment isn’t used on a century that can’t be divided by 400. That meant last century (2000) was a leap year but next one (2100) will not be.

I’m pretty sure I won’t be able to post a blog to confirm that, though.

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)